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Sample Job Application Essay Sample

Sample College Application Essay #8

Another excellent free college application essay designed to help inspire college-bound students working on college and university application essays.

“Hello my name is Roy Hon nice to meet you,” stiffly mumbled a boy with an awkward accent, eyes full of fear and uncertainty. Immersed in an unknown environment at the age of thirteen, everything seemed uncertain to him. In this mysterious land, people existed in all shapes and colors: black, white, blonde, brunette, and every combination in between. Despite these physical differences, however, everyone shared one thing in common: English, the language that tied lives together and facilitated communication between diverse individuals. The foreign boy, however, knew little of the English language, able to understand and speak no more than a toddler in that tongue. He never imagined one day settling in the United States or eventually sitting in his room and composing a college essay in English.

Upon first arriving in the U.S, I was extremely lonely, lacking any friends or family in whom to confide. This massive transition in my life saddled me with great pain and sadness. At school I seemed invisible while at home, television provided my only companionship. I missed China, longing for delicious authentic Chinese foods and thirsting for the love of my big family and dear friends. I clung to memories of my previous home to inject warmth and happiness into my otherwise dismal life.

Building relationships was not easy, as I was fearful of approaching others due to my language deficiencies. “If only I could speak English,” I constantly thought.

“If only I could speak English,” I would not seethe with anger whenever someone openly mocked me, responding with a bowed head or fake smile.

“If only I could speak English,” I would stop shaking when speaking in front of my class.

“If only I could speak English,” I would earn grades that accurately reflected my intellect, rather than simply marks of “OK” on tests.

“If only I could speak English,” I would not have to answer questions by simply nodding or shaking my head.

Such thoughts filled my head every day, each tantalizing me with how my life would improve if I could speak English. Again, however, I realized I was living in a fantasy world; I had fallen into the habit of simply dreaming about how my life could improve and wishing that things were better rather than actually striving to enact those improvements. Realizing this, I became a pragmatic person, focused on the present and working to turn thoughts into action. I forced myself to communicate, even if doing so occasionally caused embarrassment. Once upon arriving to class late, the teacher greeted me with, “What’s up, Roy?” Not understanding this colloquial phrase, my eyes glanced upwards, before refocusing on the teacher as I answered, “Nothing.” Immediately laughter rippled across the classroom; I laughed too, though without knowing why. When class ended, I gathered my courage and asked my teacher to explain what had happened; I wanted to learn, even if it was initially embarrassing or confusing.

If only I could speak English: instead of a refrain of remorse, I used this thought to motivate my growth. It helped me overcome the struggles I faced in this new land, turning me into a realistic, social, and confident individual. By forcing myself to make friends in school, I became outgoing and independent, willing to interact with diverse classmates. As I did so, I realized that I had become friends with half of the people in my grade. In opening up, I found that the world was not nearly as scary or dreadful as I had feared; instead, it was full of warmth and positive energy. Previously, I had lacked friends not because I couldn’t speak English, but because I had built wall around myself with my negative energy and focus on what I could not do. Now, though, I am vice president of the Chinese Culture Club, a top student, and a confident friend to many.

Looking back, I still remember the innocent and quiet boy who arrived in this country, afraid of even trying to talk. How far that boy has grown; now, I am a man who loves greeting others: “Hey! What’s up, I’m Roy, it’s a pleasure to meet you!”

For access to 100 free sample successful admissions essays, visit EssayEdge.com
, the company The New York Times calls “the world’s premier application essay editing service.” You’ll also find other great essay and editing resources (some free and some fee-based) at EssayEdge.

Go back to Writing the College Application Essay.


Sample Excellent College Application Essay #6

Sample Essay #6

Another excellent free college application essay designed to help inspire college-bound students working on college and university application essays.

Passengers dozed peacefully in the cramped, cold, and dark cabin, eye masks on. A sudden jolt, riveting the plane, spurred only a few grumbling snorts from the unconscious travelers. The engines droned while chatty flight attendants gossiped behind a curtain.

Everyone seemed at ease, if not bored. Passengers stared blankly at the monitors in front of them and stewardesses sighed when summoned by blinking lights bearing their caricatured silhouettes. I imagined pilots, surrounded by panels of crude switches, nodding off in the wake of the vast and empty frontier ahead of them. I, however, found the flight neither boring nor exciting; as a twelve-year-old, everything about air travel terrified me. My white-knuckled fists, glistening with cold perspiration, clamped onto the nearest armrest at the mere hint of turbulence. My breath came in shallow gasps as I kept my ears perked for any sign of disruption in the engine’s consistent rumble. I bawled during takeoff, clenched my eyes shut while landing, and remained fidgety and sour in the intervening hours.

This phobia began affecting me long before my actual departure, days or sometimes even weeks in advance. At first I would lie awake into the wee hours of the night, actively calling forth violent fantasies of what could very well happen during the coming flight. My first vision would be of a quick death: the plane explodes, instantly consuming all its passengers in the conflagration. I considered this possibility most preferable, as I would not have to endure the torturous moments of panicky contemplation that would accompany falling to my death. What if the plane did not simply explode, though? What if a wing dropped off at 30,000 feet? My fantasies would delve into every conceivable disaster, each less plausible yet more terrifying than the previous. Just how carefully did they inspect the engines?

In fact, my mind would be so consumed by thoughts of my impending demise on the flight that the prospect of survival would was begin to seem improbable, despite my continued existence flight after flight. On this particular trip, though, my fears were nearly realized. After settling into my seat as much as I was capable after takeoff, my gaze flickered out the window, coming to rest on the billowy plains below. My father joined me and began naming the illuminated grid patterns and landmasses gliding by beneath us when he noticed something I had not: a stream steadily flowing out the edge of the wing.

We called for an attendant, who in turn brought the captain.

I tried not to look or listen as the pilot arrived at my seat to observe the phenomenon. He craned his neck in what seemed a scrupulous observation and, after a few moments of squinting, delivered his analysis.

“We should call this one in.”

My father and I leaned forward, expecting more explanation or at least some tangible emotion. “And…?”

The pilot, however, returned to the cockpit without answer, apparently realizing that we would not be able to comprehend, much less do anything about the information he had just gathered.

Eventually technicians determined that the fluid streaming out of the plane was, in fact, jet fuel, and though our supply was sufficient to reach our destination despite the leak, a lightning strike or spark of any kind would ignite the plane’s left engine, sending us ablaze into a spiraling freefall terminating in the dark Pacific. No doubt this would delay our arrival. At this announcement, two passengers had seizures and a jittery man seated behind me had to be handcuffed. Most, however, remained quietly anxious in their seats and either resumed napping or continued to stare cross-eyed into the tiny monitors ensconced in the headrests of the persons in front of them.

Remarkably in this tense situation, I suddenly stopped obsessing about crashing. Now that I was actually facing real aviation danger, I refused to let fear overwhelm me during what could have been the last moments of my life. Though the chances of our plane being struck by lightning still hovered at roughly half of one percent, those tiny odds were still far greater than the chance of encountering an accident on any other normal flight, which had previously been enough to scare me into near total incapacitation. The increased threat of death did not send me into panic, instead focusing my thoughts on my goals and future. In that situation, I clung tightly to the two very important people sitting next me as I reminisced about those I would leave at home and imagined the new friends and acquaintances I might never meet.

I realized then that fear was really just noise, a mere distraction drawing me away from the issues of real importance in my life. It was tunnel vision, corrupting my mentality, consuming me totally in its overwhelmingly irrational, one-dimensional state. It was an addiction and a vice, and I had lived with it for far too long. Because of it, I had grown used to enduring flights like I did the nightmares I contrived; they seemed to never end.

Thanks to my newfound clarity, the remaining hours of that tense flight slipped away without dread, and I never again obsessed over our odds even as we touched down. Instead, more important things replaced those figures and fantasies, such as the duties and goals I aspired to accomplish during my life. Rather than focusing on fear, I resolved to direct my energies and thoughts at all that I have left to accomplish. While I have no control over possibly perishing in a freak airplane accident, I do have the ability to improve my chance of attaining my dreams; thus, I intend to spend my life constantly looking forward, rather than worrying about how high I rise or how far I may fall.

For access to 100 free sample successful admissions essays, visit EssayEdge.com, the company The New York Times calls “the world’s premier application essay editing service.” You’ll also find other great essay and editing resources (some free and some fee-based) at EssayEdge.

Go back to Writing the College Application Essay.


Sample Excellent College Application Essay #7

Sample Essay #7

Another excellent free college application essay designed to help inspire college-bound students working on college and university application essays.

“Let me help you, ma’am; all you need to do is match the number on your bingo board with the number I call out. Whenever you have a match, just put this little red chip on top of it. And of course, don’t forget to say ‘Bingo!’ when you have a line of five red chips.” After providing this instruction, I smiled at the lady and reflected on my work. As I was teaching that eighty-year-old woman how to play bingo, she, along with many other seniors, was teaching me how to live a fulfilling life.

As a dedicated volunteer at Deaconess Hospital, I work closely with elderly patients, both organizing and participating in activities. Since the summer of my junior year, I have played a vital role in assisting with bingo games for patients, helping to set up and run those games almost every Saturday. Then, prior to the start of each game, I go around the room with a colorful bowl collecting twenty-five cents from each of the players. Despite the measly sum of the fee, however, I often struggle to gather the funds; very few people willingly give up their money. One regular participant in particular — Ruth — always gives me enormous trouble when I try to collect a quarter from her. The moment I enter her sight, she never fails to say something like, “You again?” or “Don’t bother — I don’t have any money.” Despite her seemingly negative responses, I have never been discouraged; instead, I have come to consider those harsh words her normal greeting.

After batting over money for several minutes, I can finally get the game underway. I start calling out numbers while the participants are still chatting, as they never completely quiet down no matter how many times I ask; just like kids in kindergarten, they have endless things to talk about. As I shout numbers, though, another battle begins. No matter how loud I scream, Gordon — another regular player — often interrupts by shouting back at me, “What was the number?” or responding to my call of “Fifty!” with “Sixty?” Annoyed by his constant questioning, other players then inevitably begin shouting at him, “It’s fifty! Five-oh!” Impatient comments such as “Stupid,” would then fly about the room, causing me to start calling out numbers by their digits to avoid further conflict.

Every so often, one of my elderly acquaintances stops showing up at the center altogether. In asking about their whereabouts, I usually discover that they have passed away, “Gone on to a better place,” as my supervisors put it. Though a relatively common occurrence given the age of this population, I still find it sad every time this happens. Despite their stubborn unwillingness to part with a quarter, ceaseless talking, and impatience combined with hearing loss, those bingo-playing seniors have inspired me greatly. Observing them has taught me how to truly enjoy life. Even with their difficulties moving, communicating, and remembering, my elderly friends still manage to live happy and fulfilling lives, treasuring every moment of their days. They also refuse to let problems, however large or small they may be, overwhelm them. In reflecting on this, I find it amazing that young people, physically and mentally strong, complain about so much. They waste their time on alcohol and drugs, and fritter away their lives with ridiculous, mind-numbing pursuits. Working with elderly patients at the hospital has taught me that everyone gets only one chance in this world. Thus, we should strive to make the most of every day, a goal that now motivates me in all of my undertakings and a lesson that I aspire to share with others.

For access to 100 free sample successful admissions essays, visit EssayEdge.com, the company The New York Times calls “the world’s premier application essay editing service.” You’ll also find other great essay and editing resources (some free and some fee-based) at EssayEdge.

Go back to Writing the College Application Essay.


Easy writing makes hard reading.

—Ernest Hemingway

As a graduate student taking fiction writing workshops many moons ago, I recall what was most motivating to me as a creative writer. It wasn’t the reading of published or award-winning work, and it wasn’t the classroom critique given on high from the professor nor the scribble from my classmates on my manuscripts. All these things were helpful and valuable, but nothing motivated me more than comparing my fiction to the work of my peers. As I read their work carefully, both objectively and subjectively, I found myself thinking at times that I was sure I could write better than the others around me at the seminar table—then I’d read an artful, poignant story that made me wonder whether I could ever even compete.

Perhaps somewhere between these two attitudes is the most profitable approach when studying the work of your peers. In critiquing the work of others who essentially represent your competition, you should take a respectful stance both critical and kind, just as selection committee members are likely to do. The sample essays in this chapter represent personal stories that are intriguing, diverse, complex, honest, and humanizing. These samples present opportunities for you to study, admire, question, emulate, reject, and—most importantly—consider how to present the best, truest, most effective picture of yourself, carefully refined for the eyes of others.